Memory house

The Heart Sutra: A History

stochasticlife:

No one actually knows who the specific authorship of the heart sutra belongs too. It is assumed that the sutra came from a Sarvastivada monk from the Kushan Empire. The oldest portions of the sutra are thought to come from some of the earliest wisdom scriptures of the Indian School/s that went on to become Mahayana Buddhism.

It can be argued that the heart sutra is in fact the origin of Mahayana (and thus, the finger that pushed the second great turning of the wheel of dharma) 

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sirilaf:

Erwin Wurm - One Minute Sculptures (1997)

sirilaf:

Erwin Wurm - One Minute Sculptures (1997)

artandsciencejournal:

Colour Theory: A Brief History

These diagrams are 19th and 20th century attempts to systematize colours and describe how the human eye perceives them. In the late 18th century, scholars began to develop colour theory according to the understanding that three primary colours – red, yellow, and blue – could be combined to create all others; these hypotheses would be instrumental in forming early theories of colour vision and the science of perception. Although Sir Isaac Newton and Da Vinci both developed theories of colour, the German poet Goethe organized colours into the “wheel” we know today in his Theory of Colours in 1810. Albert Munsell developed his Color System which was later adopted by the US Bureau of Standards later in the century. Of course, these standards would influence not only contemporary explorations of the science of vision, but the creative disciplines of art and design as well. 

(Images from VintageTreasureShop, Beats925Books, MOMA’s Inside/Out, Postcard Club of NYC, and Imprint)

Erin Saunders

artandsciencejournal:

Dan Flavin & The Stedelijk Museum 

Many Visual Arts and Art History students will recognize Dan Flavin’s works from Art History classes. Flavin, classified by art historians and theorists as a Minimalist artist, is one of the most significant artists of the late twentieth century. His innovative break from traditional mediums of painting and sculpture is groundbreaking and his installations involving fluorescent light fixtures have ultimately shaped the course of contemporary art and New Media practices. Moreover, a trend in “light art” is continuously seen in the works of many of today’s prominent artists (Olafur Eliasson, James Turrell, Bruce Nauman, Jenny Holzer, and Tracey Emin, to name a few), each of whom have built upon Flavin’s influence in various ways. 

Flavin’s vast oeuvre consists primarily of site-specific “situations” that take on a variety of forms. Limiting his material to commercially available fluorescent tubing in industry standard sizes, Flavin’s resulting installations are both simple and thought provoking. As Flavin became more concerned with the relationship between his installations and the spaces they inhabit, he began limiting his colour palette. The result is an atmospheric, simplistic, and mediative body of work. In concerning the relationship with the space, Flavin’s works transform the space into an aspect of the installation, making us take note of various architectural elements presented by the light. Light becomes a poetic and haunting artistic medium. 

While there have been a number of retrospectives of Flavin’s works in the United States (including one at the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C.), the Stedelijk Museum in Amsterdam has recently announced its purchase of one of Flavin’s more prominent installations, a site-specific piece originally made in 1986 for the museum’s historic building. Untitled (to Piet Mondrian through his preferred colours, red, yellow and blue) and Untitled (to Piet Mondrian who lacked green) are two parts of an amazing installation that now occupies the hallway above the Stedelijk Museum’s grand staircase. 

In keeping with Flavin’s continuous influence on contemporary art, the installation will serve as a bridge connecting the museum’s collection of pre-WWII Modernist works with the works of Flavin’s late twentieth century peers. The installation in the grand staircase will be on view as part of the reopening of the Stedelijk Museum on September 23, 2012. If you are in the Amsterdam area at this time, this is one work that is not to be missed!

Victoria Nolte 

Firehorse

—If You Don't Want To Be Alone

literaryjukebox:

Everyone, at some point in their lives, wakes up in the middle of the night with the feeling that they are all alone in the world, and that nobody loves them now and that nobody will ever love them, and that they will never have a decent night’s sleep again and will spend their lives wandering blearily around a loveless landscape, hoping desperately that their circumstances will improve, but suspecting, in their heart of hearts, that they will remain unloved forever. The best thing to do in these circumstances is to wake somebody else up, so that they can feel this way, too.

Song: “If You Don’t Want To Be Alone” by Firehorse

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twinning:

Raquel Zimmermann by Juergen Teller.

twinning:

Raquel Zimmermann by Juergen Teller.